Program Profiles
Lillian Lowery

Lillian Lowery
Current Title
Former State Superintendent of Schools
Current Organization
Maryland State Department of Education

Pre-Program Information


Previous Title
Area Administrator
Previous Organization
Fort Wayne Community Schools
Previous Organization Sector
School District

The Broad Academy 2004


I grew up a child of poverty and a product of public schools. My teachers helped shape my belief that every child should be inspired to dream and given the tools to make those dreams a reality. It is our job to provide them with the strong foundation upon which to build that future.

Lillian with studentsA lifelong educator, Lillian Lowery has dedicated her career to supporting educators and boosting opportunities and outcomes for young people. As superintendent for the state of Delaware, she oversaw improvements that pushed graduation rates to an all-time high while all groups of students posted consistent annual gains in achievement. When she served as state superintendent in Maryland, she successfully implemented transitions to higher standards, better student assessments and more meaningful educator evaluations. The National Association of State Boards of Education named her Policy Leader of the Year in 2015.


Across a career in public education that spans more than three decades, Dr. Lillian Lowery held one position that doesn’t exist in most school systems: minority student achievement monitor.

This role helped Lillian, who spent 17 years as a classroom teacher and grew up in an impoverished family in the Southeast, maintain a laser-like focus on students — particularly those most vulnerable to inequity — as she rose through the administrative ranks.

As one former colleague put it, with Lillian, “it doesn’t matter if it’s a conversation about budget, about policy; it all circles back to ‘How does it improve kids’ ability to learn?’”

Lillian Lowery reading to children at elementary school

“Throughout my professional journey,” she said, “the aims for me have been consistent: To set high goals and expectations for everyone, to promote the belief that effort increases ability and to move schools and students from good to great.”

Her 2012 appointment as Maryland’s superintendent of schools put her in charge of one of the nation’s highest performing state school systems. Lillian spent her first year listening to parents, students, educators and community leaders throughout the entire state and put in at least two trips to every county, quickly identifying the biggest needs. What she found was that while state-by-state rankings may have suggested that everything was working well, it wasn’t. In fact, more than half of all Maryland students required remediation once they started college.

Her improvement plan focused on implementing a more rigorous set of college and career-ready learning standards and providing teachers with strong professional development so they are prepared to help their students meet these higher expectations.

“Maryland did not reach its national ranking by standing still, and we will not provide our students with a world-class education by resting on our prior achievements,” she said.

Before taking the post in Maryland, she served as Delaware’s education secretary, where her ability to bridge differences helped the state win one of the first two federal “Race to the Top” grants in 2010. She spearheaded the planning process for that grant, bringing together disparate interest groups around a common vision for Delaware as a leader in K-12 public education.

Since stepping down as Maryland’s state superintendent, Lillian continues to advocate on behalf of our most vulnerable students. As vice president at The Education Trust, she leads an ambitious agenda to focus national attention on inequities in our public education systems as well as the actions necessary to close gaps in opportunity and raise achievement.

And just like she did as a superintendent, Lillian continues to build strong partnerships and learn from others as she works to improve academic opportunities and outcomes for young people. “The decision to leave the classroom was one of the most agonizing decisions that I have ever made,” she said. “But what I have learned along the way is once a teacher, always a teacher. It’s just that now my students include adult learners, and we learn together.”

Career Highlights

  • Began her career as a public-school teacher and principal
  • Area superintendent, Fairfax County Public Schools, Virginia
  • Superintendent, Christina School District, Delaware
  • Delaware secretary of education
  • Maryland state superintendent of schools
Current Title
Former State Superintendent of Schools
Current Organization
Maryland State Department of Education

Pre-Program Information


Previous Title
Area Administrator
Previous Organization
Fort Wayne Community Schools
Previous Organization Sector
School District