Program Profiles
Chris Barbic

Barbic with students

Pre-Program Information


Previous Title
Founder and chief executive officer
Previous Organization
YES Prep Public Schools
Previous Organization Sector
Public Charter Network

The Broad Academy 2011


My goal is to do whatever it takes to give low-income students access to the same opportunities and resources as their more affluent peers. My experience has been that when this happens, ALL students achieve at high levels.

Chris Barbic began his career as a teacher in Houston. Dissatisfied with the options available for students, he founded YES Prep Public Schools with the goal of delivering the same access and opportunity to low-income communities that wealthy students received in private schools. Chris brought that same fervor to his tenure as the founding superintendent of the Achievement School District in Tennessee, whose purpose was to turn the state’s lowest-performing schools into the state’s highest performers.


Barbic with students

When he began the job of founding superintendent of Tennessee’s Achievement School District, Chris Barbic committed to spending a significant portion of his time — often in one-on-one meetings in people’s living rooms — with parents and community members in Frayser, the distressed north Memphis neighborhood where most of his schools would be located.

Some system leaders he knew discouraged him, suggesting that his time would be better spent on “more important issues” than talking and listening, especially with skeptics.

“Some people still see that as a ‘nice to do.’ But I know it’s a ‘must do.’ This work is not going to happen if people don’t believe in what we’re trying to do and stand shoulder-to-shoulder with us to help make it happen,” Chris said. “There’s a deep commitment required to look into parents’ eyes and make a promise — to them, to their kids, to their community. People know that when things get tough, we’re not bailing on them.”

He speaks from experience, having founded the first YES Prep public charter school in one of the oldest and lowest-income Hispanic communities in east Houston while still a young teacher. His school proposal was approved in early 1998, and he recruited 300 students, hired teachers and planned facilities, transportation, food service — all in six months, in time for school to start in the fall.

“They welcomed this white guy who wasn’t even from Texas with open arms. But they knew me. I taught their kids. I coached the Little League team. I was part of the community,” he said.

In just its first year, that secondary school was among the top performers in the state. But that wasn’t enough. Chris chose to aim YES Prep’s students at the same expectations of Houston’s private boarding schools: acceptance to a four-year college as a graduation requirement. Nearly all of YES Prep’s students would be the first in their families to attend college. It didn’t come easy, but they achieved both 100 percent graduation and 100 percent college-going with the first graduating class. The class valedictorian — whose parents didn’t finish eighth grade — attended Stanford University.

As demand grew throughout Houston, more YES Prep schools opened. In 2012, the 13-school network became the inaugural recipient of The Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools, which recognizes charter school networks that produce the best academic outcomes, particularly for traditionally disadvantaged students.

“If you create the right expectations for kids, get a group of adults who believe in what kids can achieve and provide the right support and environment, any kid — any kid — can go to college,” he said.

Known for his seemingly boundless energy and friendly, frank conversation-style, Chris brought the same level of determination to his role heading Tennessee’s Achievement School District. The statewide system, modeled after Louisiana’s Recovery School District, seeks to support and improve the state’s lowest-performing schools while maintaining their locally zoned student enrollment.

But ASD’s plan extended beyond incremental growth. The effort is focused on ensuring these schools transformed from struggling to successful, for every student and every family.

To staff these schools, Chris and his team didn’t just launch a search for excellent teachers. They also joined forces with the county school district, local university and other partners to transform the local educator pipeline and help turn Memphis into Teacher Town USA.

“We need people who know how to bring their A-game,” he said, sounding as much like a football coach as a school system leader. “You have to have a critical mass of strong teachers to get the quality of instruction that our kids need — in the ASD, in local charters and in Shelby County Schools. The power of growing and supporting great teachers is how you transform a school and a community.”

In addition, the ASD attracted top-flight school leaders and operators — with final selections made by community and parent advisory councils — and offered them more autonomy on school-level decision making in exchange for results. Chris considered empowerment one of his main charges. As he put it, “The central work doesn’t happen in the central office. The central work happens in the classroom with kids and teachers, and our job is to be the support team.”

His approach helped the ASD win praise from a broad array of Memphians, even among those who were initially skeptical. Former school board member Sara Lewis, an early vocal critic, now calls him a good friend and came to admire Barbic for being “truly committed to changing the face of public education in Memphis and all over Tennessee.”

One of the most exciting prospects about the effort is that it’s homegrown, meaning each school’s local community will continue to reap the benefits of the work for years to come. Said Chris, “It used to be that success in this neighborhood meant leaving. Now success means coming home to be part of something that is bigger than all of us. If all of the seven-year-olds in these schools never know what it’s like to be four grade levels behind in reading — like their parents might have been — and can graduate and go on to do whatever they want to do… that’s what this is about.”

Today Chris works as a senior education fellow with the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, where he uses the hard-won knowledge he’s earned as a career educator to help address systemic inequities and improve educational outcomes for students throughout the nation.

More from Chris Barbic

Charter school critics blinded by ‘Belief Gap’ – The Tennessean, December 29, 2014

“The Belief Gap is the persistent and deep divide between what parents believe their children are capable of and what some elected leadership, through word and deed, believe the very same kids can do. This gap is an ugly phenomenon anywhere, but it is most glaring and devastating in communities with high percentages of low-income and minority children.” Read more.

Career Highlights

  • Began his career as a teacher in Houston Independent School District; earned HISD’s “Outstanding Young Educator” award
  • Founder and CEO, YES Prep Public Schools
  • Served on the White House Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics
  • Superintendent, Tennessee Achievement School District

Pre-Program Information


Previous Title
Founder and chief executive officer
Previous Organization
YES Prep Public Schools
Previous Organization Sector
Public Charter Network